Analog Africa

Fundo De Mare Palinha

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Limited gatefold 10" LP + MP3 downloadIn 1976, seven Cabo Verdean musicians going by the name Voz Di Sanicolau gathered in a small recording studio in Rotterdam where they laid down an album of fearsome coladeira songs inspired by the music of their home island of São Nicolau.The album took only a few days to record, which may explain the unexpected urgency that fires each track. Treble-soaked electric guitar lines snake back and forth through percussion-and-cavaquinho driven rhythms rooted in the sound of the islands established by the previous generation of Cabo Verdean émigrés; subtle keyboards wash through the background, and the vocals, traded between Joana Do Rosario and Tô-Zé, alternately push the music forward and soar above it. The resulting album is both deeply felt and fiercely executed, and in its grooves one hears the sound of some of the finest Cabo Verdean musicians of their era locked in complete unity of purpose.It should have been the beginning of something extraordinary; but the pressures of making ends meet forced the musicians back to their day jobs, and Voz Di Sanicolau vanished as quickly as they had appeared, leaving their lone album, Fundo de Marê Palinha, as sole proof of their existence. Forty-four years later the album sounds as fresh as it did the day it was recorded. It is unknown if dutch sound engineer Frans Rolland, who oversaw the recordings, knew he was helping to make history: during these sessions, Joana Do Rosario, whose majestic vocals were crucial to the sound of Voz Di Sanicolau, became the first Cabo Verdean woman ever to appear on a long playing record.

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AADE 012

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Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Fundo De Mare Palinha
2. Italiana
3. Mare Lili
Side 2
1. Nha Antonia Engracia
2. Ribera Prata
3. Abole

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Ranil Y Su Conjunto Tropical

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Fourteen mindblowing Cumbia masterpieces – many of which have never seen wide release outside the Amazonian region. Comes in a gatefold cover pressed on 180g vinyl and includes a beautiful LP-size poster.If you travel up the Amazon, past the city of Manaus and past the Brasilian/Peruvian border, you will eventually reach the city of Iquitos. It was here that Werner Herzog filmed Fitzcarraldo, the visionary epic of one man's struggle to drag a ship over a mountain; and it was here, in a city completely cut off from the Peruvian coast, accessible only by air and water, and surrounded by impenetrable forests, that a new, distinctly Amazonian style of Cumbia emerged in the early 1970s.One of the style's greatest practitioners was Raúl Llerena Vásquez – known to the world as Ranil – is a Peruvian singer, bandleader, record-label entrepreneur and larger-than-life personality who swirled the teeming buzz of the Amazonian jungle, the unstoppable rhythms of Colombian and Brazilian dance music, and the psychedelic electricity of guitar-driven rock-and-roll into a knock-out, party-starting concoction. It's cumbia alright, but you've never heard cumbia quite like this before.Ranil's music came into being far from Lima, the Peruvian capital, where Cuban-style big band and guitar waltzes vied for popular supremacy. On the distant banks of the Amazon, where Ranil spent the early years of his adulthood working as a schoolteacher, the air was full of the criollo waltzes of his youth, carimbó rhythms from nearby Brasil and crackly broadcasts of cumbia from Colombia picked up on transistor radios.When Ranil returned to Iquitos after several years teaching in small towns, he assembled a group of musicians and prepared to take the city's nightlife by storm. His unique blend of galloping rhythms and trebly, reverberant guitar was so successful that he was soon able to take his band to Lima to record their first record at MAG studios, where many of Peru's most successful psych, rock and salsa bands began their recording careers.Yet Ranil had no intention of entering into the indentured servitude that comes with signing one's life away to a record company. Instead he established Produccions Llerena – possibly the first record label founded in the Peruvian Amazon – which allowed him to maintain complete control over the release and distribution of his music. His fearsome negotiation skills and his insistence on organising his own tours turned him into one of the central figures of the Amazonian music scene.Although his records were popular throughout the region, Ranil never sought his fortune in the capital, preferring to remain in his hometown of Iquitos where, in recent decades, he has concentrated his considerable energies on his radio and television stations, and become involved with local civic politics. Yet his legacy has continued to grow among those fortunate enough to track down copies of his legendary – and legendarily difficult to find – LPs.Ranil's extraordinary output has remained one of the best kept secrets among collectors of cumbia and psychedelic Latin sounds.With the release of Ranil y su Conjunto Tropicalit is a secret no longer. Assembled by Analog Africa founder Samy Ben Redjeb from original LPs sourced from Ranil himself, this fully-licenced compilation presents 14 tracks – many of which have never seen wide release outside the Amazonian region – by a singular artist at the very height of his considerable powers. Prepare yourself for a guitar groove you won't soon forget.

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AADE 011

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Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Muevete Mi Amor
2. Vuelo A Saturno
3. Las Oladas
4. Lamento
5. La Minga
6. Mi Querido Ucayali
7. Licenciado
Side 2
1. Cumbia En Tu Soledad
2. Cumbia Sin Nombre
3. Rojo Lamento
4. Angel Terrenal
5. Marlenita
6. La Tuctuructia
7. La Danza De Don Lucho

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Mogadisco: Dancing Mogadishu: Somalia 1972-1991

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After being blown away by a few tunes - probably just as you will be after listening to this - Samy Ben Redjeb travelled to the infamous capital city of Somalia in November of 2016, making Analog Africa the first music label to set foot in Mogadishu.On his arrival in Somalia Samy began rifling through piles of cassettes and listening to reel-to-reel tapes in the dusty archives of Radio Mogadishu, looking for music that 'swam against the current'.The stars were aligned: an uncovered and unmarked pile of discarded recordings was discovered in a cluttered corner of the building. Colonel Abshir - the senior employee and protector of Radio Mogadishu's archives - clarified that the pile consisted mostly of music nobody had manage to identify, or music he described as being 'mainly instrumental and strange music'. At the words 'strange music' Samy was hooked, the return flight to Tunisia was cancelled.The pile turned out to be a cornucopia of different sounds: radio jingles, background music, interludes for radio programmes, television shows and theatre plays. There were also a good number of disco tunes, some had been stripped of their lyrics, the interesting parts had been recorded multiple times then cut, taped together and spliced into a long groovy instrumental loop. Over the next three weeks, often in watermelon-, grapefruit-juice and shisha-fuelled night-time sessions behind the fortified walls of Radio Mogadishu, Samy and the archive staff put together Mogadisco: Dancing Mogadishu, 1974-1991.Like everywhere in Africa during the 1970s, both men and women sported huge afros, bell-bottom trousers and platform shoes. James Brown, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye and The Temptations' funk were the talk of the town.In 1977, Iftin Band were invited to perform at the Festac festival in Lagos where they represented Somalia at the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture. Not only did they come back with an award but they also returned with Afrobeat. At the same time Bob Marley was busy kick-starting reggae-mania in Somalia, which became such a phenomenon that even the police and military bands began playing it. Some say that it was adopted so quickly because of the strong similarities with the traditional beat from the western region of Somalia, called Dhaanto.But then suddenly the trousers got tighter as the disco tsunami hit the country. Michael Jackson appeared with a new sound that would revolutionise Somalia's live music scene. You couldn't walk the streets of Mogadishu without seeing kids trying to moonwalk.'Somalia had several nightclubs and although most use DJs to play records, some hotels like Jubba, Al-Uruba and Al Jazeera showcased live bands such as Iftin and Shareero' - so ran a quote from a 1981 article about the explosion of Mogadishu's live music scene. The venues mentioned in that article were the luxury hotels that had been built to cover the growing demands of the tourist industry.Mogadisco was not Analog Africa's easiest project. Tracking down the musicians - often in exile in the diaspora - to interview them and gather anecdotes of golden-era Mogadishu has been an undertaking that took three years. Tales of Dur-Dur Band's kidnapping, movie soundtracks recorded in the basements of hotels, musicians getting electrocuted on stage, others jumping from one band to another under dramatic circumstances, and soul singers competing against each other, are all stories included in the massive booklet that accompanies the compilation - adorned with no less then 50 pictures from the '70s and '80s.As Colonel Abshir Hashi Ali, chief don at the Radio Mogadishu archive - someone who once wrestled a bomber wielding an unpinned hand-grenade to the floor - put it: 'I have dedicated my life to this place. I'm doing this so it can get to the next generation; so that the culture, the heritage and the songs of Somalia don't disappear.'

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AALP 089

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Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Dur Dur Band - Daraadaa Muxibo
2. Omar Shoolil - Hab Isii
3. Mukhtar Ramadan Idii - Check Up My Head
Side 2
1. Bakaka Band - Geesiyada Halgamayow
2. Fadumo Qassim & Waaberi Band - Waa Kaa Helaa
3. Iftin Band - Sirmaqabe
Side 3
1. Mukhtar Ramadan Idii - Baayo
2. Ahmed Shimaali & Ahmed Sharif "Killer" - Hoobeya
3. Dur Dur Band - Shaleedayaa
Side 4
1. Dur Dur Band - Ladaney
2. Bakaka Band - Gobonimada Jira
3. Iftin Band - Ii Ooy Aniga

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Jambu E Os Miticos Sons Da Amazonia 1974-1986

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gatefold 140 gram vinyl 2xLP + MP3 download code + 24 page booklet

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AALP 088

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Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Rosvaldo Ja Chegou? (intro)
2. Pinduca - Vamos Farrear
3. Os Muiraquitans - A Misturada
4. Os Quentes De Terra Alta - Praia Do Algodoal
5. Pinduca - Pai Xango
Side 2
1. Janjao - Meu Barquinho
2. Messias Holanda - O Galo Canta, O Macaco Assovia
3. Vieira E Seu Conjunto - Lambada Da Baleia
4. Verequete E O Conjunto Uirapuru - Mambo Assanhado
5. O Conjunto De Orlando Pereira - Carimbo Para Yemanja
Side 3
1. Pinduca - Coco Da Bahia
2. Messias Holanda - Carimbo Da Pimienta
3. Verequete E O Conjunto Uirapuru - Da Garrafa Uma Pinga
4. O Conjunto De Orlando Pereira - Maruda
Side 4
1. Magalhaes E Sua Guitarra - Xango
2. Vieira E Seu Conjunto - Melo Do Bode
3. Grupo Da Pesada - Voa Andorinha
4. Grupo Da Pesada - Lundun Da Yaya
5. Mestre Cupijo E Seu Ritmo - Despedida

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De Bassari Togo

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In 1972, Orchestre Abass released two incredible singles on Polydor. These records - featuring Samarin Banza, Haka Dunia and other afrofunk masterpieces - were powerful enough to knock any music head out, but it wasn’t until the discovery of some unreleased material by the band that the seeds for this project were planted.It all happened in 2008 in Ghana. I was going through some tapes that had previously been the property of PolyGram one of the major record companies based in west Africa. In the late 80s political instability and curfews had paralysed the music industry forcing Polygram to close their Ghanaian subsidiaries leaving all of their recordings behind. These recordings had been packed in boxes and left vegetating in an Accra warehouse for three decades until I came along. To my surprise all of the tapes looked unharmed and I was particularly relieved to hear that the Orchestre Abass tape was in an excellent state of condition. I began fiddling around with the idea of releasing an album of the band and that plan got an additional boost with le “coup de grace” which had landed in the form of an ultra rare tune called Honam discovered in Sotoboua, a small northern Togolese town in the middle of nowhere. That find completed this selection.I had previously discovered some similar music in Northern Benin and in Nigeria and I started picturing an area that spread all the way from Northern Ghana to Northern Cameroon, an area I dubbed ‘The Islamic funk belt’ due to the fact that Super Borgou de Parakou, Napo De Mi Amor, Uppers International and Hamad Kalkaba just to name a few - all from that ‘belt’ - were groups made up of musicians with an Islamic background. This can be felt and heard in the music and particularly in the singing since many of the musicians had attended koranic schools and the languages used in the songs often had Arabic elements fused in - Orchestra Abass was one of them. With their heavy, organ-led sound combining with the deftest of musical touches, these records were the work of a rhythmic powerhouse and we are honoured to be in a position to present the recordings of Togo´s funkiest Band.Unfortunately Malam Issa Abass, the founder, guitarist and organ player of the band, was killed in 1993 by a grenade thrown into his bedroom and to help me reconstruct the biography of the band I tracked down Thon Komla, one of the band´s songwriters and Abderaman Issa, the guitar player of the band.All the music was licensed directly from the various composers of these songs. The vinyl is pressed on 180 High Quality Virgin Vinyl and the gatefold contains previously unseen pictures and a detailed biography of the might band.

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AADE 010

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Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Haka Dunia
2. Soo Soo Mungha (previously unreleased)
3. Ekule Nugble Nu (previously unreleased)
Side 2
1. Shamarin Banza
2. Honam (feat Thon Komla)
3. Kissagui (feat Napo De Mi Amor)

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Buli Povo

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AADE 08

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33.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Amizade Belo Pereira
2. Desgracada
3. Pinta Manta
4. Bem De Fora
Side 2
1. Buli Povo
2. Bencao De Gente Grade
3. Amor De Irmao

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African Scream Contest 2

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Ten years on, crate-digger Samy Ben Redjeb unveils a new treasuretrove of Vodoun-inspired Afrobeat heavy funk crossover greatness. Right from the raw guitar fanfare which kicks off Les Sympathics’ pile-driving opener, it’s clear that African Scream Contest II is going to be every bit as joyous a voyage of discovery as its predecessor.A great compilation can open the gate to another world. Who knew that some of the most exciting Afro-funk records of all time were actually made in the small West African country of Benin? Once Analog Africa released the first African Scream Contest in 2008, the proof was there for all to hear; gut-busting yelps, lethally welldrilled horn sections and irresistibly insistent rhythms added up to a record that took you into its own space with the same electrifying sureness as any favourite blues or soul or funk or punk sampler you might care to mention.Ten years on, intrepid crate-digger Samy Ben Redjeb unveils a new treasuretrove of Vodoun-inspired Afrobeat heavy funk crossover greatness. Right from the laceratingly raw guitar fanfare which kicks off Les Sympathics’ pile-driving opener, it’s clear that African Scream Contest II is going to be every bit as joyous a voyage of discovery as its predecessor. And just as you’re trying to get off the canvas after this one-punch knock out, an irresistible Afro-ska romp with a more than subliminal echo of the Batman theme puts you right back there. Ignace De Souza and the Melody Aces’ “Asaw Fofor" would’ve been a killer instrumental but once you’ve factored in the improbably-rich-to-the-point-of-being-Nat-King-Cole-influenced lead vocal, it’s a total revelation.The screaming does not stop there, in fact it’s only just beginning. But the strange thing about African Scream Contest II’s celebration of unfettered Beninese creativity is that it would not have been possible without the assistance of a musician who had been trained by the Russian secret services to "search and destroy" enemies of the country’s (then) Marxist-Leninist president Mathieu Kerekou.Already familiar to fans of the first African Scream Contest as a mainstay of ruthlessly disciplined military band Les Volcans de la Capitale, Lokonon André vanished in a cloud of dust at Ben Redjeb’s behest with a list of names and some petrol money, only to return a few days later having miraculously tracked down every single name he’d been given. The source of this Afrobeat bounty-hunter’s impressive people-finding skills - his training with the KGB - highlights the tension between encroaching authoritarian politics and fearless expressions of personal creative freedom which is the back-story of so much great African music of the 60s and 70s.Happily, in this instance, Lokonon was tracking the artists down to offer them licensing deals, rather than to arrest them.Where some purveyors of vintage African sounds seem to be strip-mining the continent’s musical heritage with no less rapacious intent than the mining companies and colonial authorities who previously extracted its mineral wealth, Samy Ben Redjeb’s determination to track this amazing music to its human sources pays huge karmic dividends.Like every other Analog Africa release, African Scream Contest II is illuminated by meticulously researched text and effortlessly fashion-forward photography supplied by the artists themselves. Looming large - alongside Lokonon André - in the cast of biopic-worthy characters to emerge from this seductive tropical miasma is visionary space-nerd Bernard Dohounso, who laid the foundations for Benin’s vinyl predominance by importing and assembling the turntables that would play the products of his Bond villain-acronymed pressing plant SATEL, a factory that would revolutionise the music industry in the whole region.The scene documented here couldn’t have been born anywhere else but in the Benin Republic , and the prime reason for that is Vodoun. It’s one of the world’s most complex religions, involving the worship of some 250 divinities, where each divinity has its own specific set of rhythms, and the bands introduced on the African Scream Contest series and other compilations from that country were no less diverse than that army of different Gods. At once restless pioneers and masters of the art of modernising their own folklore, the mystic sound of Vodoun was their prime source of inspiration. One especially irascible Vodoun-adept was Antoine Dougbe, who styled himself “The devil’s prime minister” while turning ancestral rhythms into satanically alluring modern beats. As Orchestre Poly-Rythmo songwriter Pynasco has observed sagely, “Evil is not elsewhere; evil extends into the house”. And African Scream Contest II is a gloriously cinematic road-trip through an undiscovered realm of music lore whose familiarity is every bit as thrilling as its otherness.

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AALP 086

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35.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Les Sympathics De Porto Novo - A Min We Vo Nou We
2. Ignace De Souza & The Melody Aces - Asaw Fofor
3. Stanislas Tohon - Dja Dja Dja
Side 2
1. Elias Akadiri & Sunny Black's Band - L'enfance
2. Picoby Band D'Abomey - Me Adomina
3. Antoine Dougbe - Nounignon Ma Klon Midji
4. Orchestre Poly-Rythmo De Cotonou - Moulon Devia
Side 3
1. Black Santiago - Paulina
2. Lokonon Andre Et Les Volcans - Glenon Ho Akue
3. Sebastien Pynasco & L'Orchestre Black Santiago - Sade
4. Super Borgou De Parakou - Baba L'Oke Ba'Wagbe
Side 4
1. Cornaire Salifou Michel Et L'Orchestre El Rego & Ses Commandos - Gangnidodo
2. Gnonnas Pedro & His Dadjes Band - How Much Love Naturally Cost
3. Orchestre Poly-Rythmo De Cotonou - Idavi

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Pop Makossa - The Invasive Dance Beat Of Cameroon 1976-1984

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The Pop Makossa adventure started in 2009, when Analog Africa founder Samy Ben Redjeb first travelled to Cameroon to make an initial assessment of the country’s musical situation. He returned with enough tracks for an explosive compilation highlighting the period when funk and disco sounds began to infiltrate the Makossa style popular throughout Cameroon.So why has it taken almost eight years from that first visit to the final compilation? From the very beginning, there were several mysteries hanging over Pop Makossa.What had happened to Bill Loko, the teenage super-star whose monster hit ‘Nen Lambo’ caused such a sensation that he was forced to flee to the other side of the world? How did bandleader Eko Roosevelt go from Cameroonian prodigy to chief of an idyllic seaside village? And who exactly was Mystic Djim, the dreadlocked producer and mercurial hit-maker whose wizardry on a simple home four-track recorder could outshine even the mighty studios of Cameroon’s National Radio station?It was not until DJ and music producer Déni Shain was dispatched to Cameroon to finalise the project, license the songs, scan photographs, and interview the artists that some of the biggest question marks began to disappear. His journey from the port city of Douala to the capital of Yaoundé brought him in contact with the lives and stories of many of the musicians who had shaped the sound of Cameroon’s dance music in its most fertile decade.Indeed, all the tracks on Pop Makossa are a revelation. The beat that holds everything together has its origins in the rhythms of the Sawa people, Ambassey, Bolobo, Assiko and Essewé, a traditional funeral dance. But it wasn’t until these rhythms arrived in the cities of Cameroon and collided with Merengue, High-Life, Congolese Rumba, and, later, Funk and Disco, that modern Makossa was born.Makossa, the beat that long before football, managed to unify the whole of Cameroon, was successful in part because it was so adaptable. Some of the greatest Makossa hits incorporated the electrifying guitars and tight grooves of funk, while others were laced with cosmic flourishes made possible by the advent of the synthesizer. However much came down to the bass, and from the rubbery hustle underpinning Mystic Djim’s ‘Yaoundé Girls’ to the luminous liquid disco lines which propel Pasteur Lappé’s ‘Sekele Movement’, Pop Makossa demonstrates why Cameroonian bass players are some of the most revered in the world.Yet at the end of it all, there was still one final mystery facing the production team at Analog Africa: how was this compilation of amazing sounds from Cameroon going to begin?After many month and hundreds of different running orders, something still didn’t seem to click … until one day they came across a mighty song entitled ‘Pop Makossa Invasion,’ recorded for Radio Buea, a tune so obscure that even in Cameroon it had never been released. Suddenly the whole compilation fell into place. ‘Pop Makossa Invasion’ makes its debut here and joins the pantheon of extraordinary songs that plugged Cameroon’s Makossa style into the modern world.

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AALP 083

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Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Dream Stars - Pop-Makossa
2. Mystic Djim - Yaounde Girls
3. Bill Loko - Nen Lambo
4. Pasteur Lappe - Sanaga Calypso
5. Eko Roosevelt - Monguele Mam
6. Olinga Gaston - Ngon Engap
7. Emmanuel Kahe & Jeanette Kemogne - Ye Medjuie
8. Nkodo Si Tony - Mininga Meyong Mese
9. Pasteur Lappe - Sekele Movement
10. Bernard Ntone - Mussoliki
11. Pat´Ndoye - More Love
12. Clement Djimogne - Africa

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Best Woman

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AADE 05

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33.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Best Woman
2. Vi Deka
Side 2
1. Maimouna Cherie
2. Wa Do Verite Ton Noumi

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Sweet Sweet Dreams

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AALP 082

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33.00
Tracklist: 

Side 1
1. Let's Make It Up
2. Let's Get It Together
3. D'Hardest (bonus track)
Side 2
1. Moon Walking
2. Without Love
3. Way, Way Out

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